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Mnemonic Rhythms of the Ukrainian Revolution: Sounds, Affects, and Time in Maidan and Winter on Fire

Authors
Jiyun Kim
Issue Date
Aug-2022
Publisher
영상미디어센터
Keywords
Sound Studies; Memory Studies; Affect Theory; Trauma Theory; Ukrainian History; Sergei Loznitsa; Evgeny Afineevsky 소리 연구; 기억 연구; 정동 이론; 트라우마 이론; 우크라이나 역사; 세르게이 로즈니차; 에브네기 아피네예브스키
Citation
씨네포럼, no.42, pp.155 - 185
Journal Title
씨네포럼
Number
42
Start Page
155
End Page
185
URI
https://yscholarhub.yonsei.ac.kr/handle/2021.sw.yonsei/6318
DOI
10.19119/cf.2022.08.42.155
ISSN
2094-9839
Abstract
This paper compares the two documentaries on the Ukrainian revolution, Maidan (2014) and Winter on Fire: Ukraine's Fight for Freedom (2015), exploring how the films' acoustic aesthetics cause different affects and their significance in remembering the collective trauma. The two works' soundscapes can be characterized as musical ‘singing’ and linguistic ‘telling’: Maidan repeats protesters' folk songs and musical performances, while testimonies of a specific group of citizens lead the plot of Winter on Fire. Accordingly, the former causes not-completely conscious feelings, allowing a bodily ‘experience’ of the Euromaidan, while the latter urges the viewers to empathically ‘witness’ the narrated emotion and thereby ‘participate’ in the lives of one particular camp. Furthermore, this paper grasps the chronological flow of passions during the one-and-half-year gap between the films: Maidan represents only ‘shameful’ nationalism and ‘mourning,’ but Winter on Fire eventually reaches ‘hope’ and ‘sense of responsibility’ for future generations. Such changing sentiments develop the ‘crying’ of protesters, which is reminiscent of that of a newly born baby, into the first ‘babbling’ statements of survivors, renewing Ukraine's historical memory and national identity. Nevertheless, the borderland geopolitics of Ukraine, as reflected in the current Russo-Ukrainian War, along with the potential of affects that resists narrativization and transcends the finitude of language, still demand the non-definite vibrations of Maidan. In other words, the historicized narrative must be again dismantled and reinvented with affective croonings. This paper concludes that this mnemonic rhythm of society has to ethically repeat itself, winding and fluctuating toward the future past.
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